Results of our Read-a-thon

We just completed our third annual read-a-thon!

 

Insha's drawing, which she sent in with her collection for Aschiana

Insha’s drawing, which she sent in with her collection for Aschiana

Insha, Ruby, and Lulu, we missed you at our wrap-up party.  And we’re so proud of your great reading!  Thank you for your contribution to our good work!

Here are some pictures that Aschiana sent to show us how important and helpful our donation to their aid efforts are…

Aschiana's photo of a refugee camp in Afghanistan

Aschiana’s photo of a refugee camp in Afghanistan

Aschiana's photo of some of the displaced children in Afghanistan's camps

Aschiana’s photo of some of the displaced children in Afghanistan’s camps

Aschiana's photo of their aid workers handing out clothing to displaced children in the camps

Aschiana’s photo of their aid workers handing out clothing to displaced children in the camps

For more info about Aschiana’s great work, visit Aschiana Foundation

Click here to see Ina Kozel’s artwork

Love the world!

Advertisements

Keeping the River Clean


We had a meeting the other day about the Hudson River.   We learned that the Hudson River is an estuary. An estuary is a body of water where salt water and fresh water mixes together. Another thing about estuaries is that they’re tidal, and so the water gets high and low throughout the day.  At high tide, the water can take garbage a person might have accidentally left on the beach and sweep it out into the water.

We also learned that there is a food chain in the Hudson River that leads to us, and the younger kids drew food webs, which show how everything in the wild is connected and how everything relies on everything else in order to survive.

Ari with food web showing connections between all elements.  Ari said, "Without the sun, there wouldn't be anything at all!"

Ari with food web showing connections between all elements. Ari said, “Without the sun, there wouldn’t be anything at all!”

The older kids made charts to show how much bacteria was in the water and when.

Guin's frequency chart, which shows how often water samples taken by Riverkeeper were acceptable, possible risk and unacceptable levels of enterococcus.

Guin’s frequency chart, which shows how often water samples taken by Riverkeeper were acceptable, possible risk and unacceptable levels of enterococcus.

You can see that the samples tested acceptable more often than unacceptable, which means that the River isn’t so polluted as it used to be.

My chart also shows that the amount of rain that falls the week before the sample was taken (the orange line) can have an effect on the amount of bacteria in the water.  And the purple line shows that they don’t take samples when it’s raining because that stirs up the bacteria in the water which affects the sample!

So all of that means, you probably shouldn’t swim in the Hudson River after it rains.

There are many reasons to keep the Hudson River, or any other river, clean. Here are some:

*all bodies of water are connected so any garbage we throw in the river will end up in the ocean and become an even worse problem (for the animals and plants that live there, and for our food web and health)

*garbage can kill animals and fish that live in the river

*we swim in rivers

*we drink from rivers

*it’s pretty to look at rivers without garbage in it

You see , it is important to keep the river clean. When we keep the river clean, we are keeping the river, animals, and humans safe.

If you are interested in keeping the river clean, you can meet us at Kingston Point Beach on May 11th. We have signed up to be part of the annual community action day called the Riverkeeper Sweep. Different groups like ours are given a part of the beach to clean up. We hope we’ll see you there!

-Zoe

Wildlife Rescuers!

Last week our Roots & Shoots group went to a Wildlife Rehabilitation Center. There were lots of awesome birds. I counted them. There were four bard owls, one barn owl, two screech owls, one black vulture, a seagull, a morning dove and a swan. There were a couple of ravens, a small hawk and five other red-tailed hawks, along with two great horned owls. In all, there were twenty birds!

Each animal had its own, amazing story and hardly any animals had the same. One red-tailed hawk had lived as a pet in someone’s living room for two years. You can watch the movie we made to hear a couple of the stories.

I was always sad when I heard that an animal couldn’t be returned into the wild. All these animals belong in nature and when an animal can’t survive it is sad. Luckily, they have Ellen to care for them!

Thank you, Ellen, for taking care of birds, big and small, and for showing us the birds. I also want to thank everybody who came for your cooperation, interest and donation.

-Zoe

Note from Hillary:

Our visit to Ravensbeard was also a fundraiser where each family contributed a little bit and together we were able to donate almost $50 to the center and Ellen for her great work!

Be sure to check out Ellen’s website to learn more about simple things you can do to help wildlife as well as how you can help wildlife in trouble.  You can be a rescuer, too!

Also, contact Ellen for your own group’s educational program or for your child’s next birthday party!

R&S with Ellen

DIY: Upcycled Fashion Show

The Blue Bird Meeting

Remember when we made those blue bird boxes last spring?  Well, now we got the chance to put it up somewhere!  The Comeau Property is a big, 77-acre piece of land that is kind of like a wildlife refuge.  Animals are protected there, including blue birds!  We offered one of the blue bird boxes we made to them, knowing it would be a good home for it.  Bob Rifenburg, the local blue bird expert, helped us picked out a good spot for it in a big, beautiful field where I like to play soccer.  Terry Antman, the woman in charge of these kind of donations,  arranged for our blue bird meeting to happen on Comeau Appreciation  Day. There were a lot of fun things happening that day.  My favorite thing was when they lit a paper lantern into the sky. A lot of people came to watch us put the bluebird box up and Bob gave a little talk on bluebirds. Check out the highlights in this video, and don’t miss the funny part at the end!

-Zoe

Readers Re-Unite!

Today the readers from the read-a-thon got together again.  The World Wildlife Fund sent us plushes of the endangered species we helped to save with our donation to thank us.  I got a blue whale!  The other kids got a dolphin, hummingbirds, seahorses, sea turtles, pygmy elephants, a polar bear, tigers, a zebra, a wolf, an amur leopard, and a cheetah.  We got one plush for everybody!  And we got a trio of kittens for the group, along with a big tiger.

11 of our 16 readers (plus one little brother).  Not pictured: William, Bastien, Emma, Kayla and Lora.  We missed you guys!

They also sent us this sweet letter.

You’re never too old to play with stuffed animals!

-Zoe

Thrills and Drills

The other day we built habitats for bluebirds so they could have homes.  They need homes because they are getting beaten up by starlings who take their nests.  And they need a lot of space, but people are taking up their habitats.

We want to thank one of the moms, Brooke, who had this great idea and helped us with it.  Someone gave her the kits, and she thought our Roots & Shoots group would have fun making them.  What I liked best was hammering into the wood.

Now we’re going to get together again to paint them.  We’re going to call some of our local parks to see if we can put them up there.  We hope the bluebirds enjoy these beautiful houses we made.

FUN FACT:  Bluebirds are a symbol of happiness!

-Zoe

Previous Older Entries